Jargon Buster

Consultants just love to use jargon. In an effort to demystify some of the terminology, we've defined some of the terms we hear used. The definitions are by no means sacred - and you'll find that other consultancies may define the terms in different ways. But at least you'll now know what WE mean and we promise to use as few as possible!​

 

BESPOKE TARGETED NETWORKS

A community for every geek thing out there.

BIG DATA

No, not an Excel sheet viewed at 150% for the visually challenged, it is in fact integrating huge amounts of meta-data to arrive at new insights.

BRAND ARCHITECTURE

The way a portfolio of brands is structured. This is normally the basis of the brand model. Spanning from a 'monolithic' architecture where the brand name and identity is used for all products and services to 'free-standing' architecture to where a brand or corporation may be offstage and each product or service has its own particular brand. It's the difference between central control and free expression. Think BMW versus P&G.

BRAND ESSENCE

The brand expressed in the simplest, most single-minded terms e.g. Volvo = safety. Brand boiled down to the jus. The brand essence often forms the basis for the advertising tag line. E.g. Nike= Just do it.

BRAND EXPERIENCE

Mainly used by agencies to describe controlled environments such as promotional events or expos where the brand is brought to life and is often interactive. This can apply to products, communications or behaviours.

BRAND IDENTITY

The combination of tangible communication assets normally protected by copyright. Traditionally comprising logo, symbol, typefaces, colours and tone of voice. This can be broken down by visual and verbal identity.

BRAND IMAGE

Derived from a 1980s term to describe the brand from the perspective of the consumer. Where the identity is something controlled by the owner, the consumer decides the image.

BRAND MANAGER

The person who gets all the credit when it works or fired when it doesn't!

BRAND MODEL

The strategy and architecture of a brand expressed as a schematic. These can vary from 'Brand Wheels to Brand Pyramids to Brand Bicycles (just kidding) ' depending on the agency. Often used as shorthand for different types or approaches to branding e.g. 'Virgin's Championing model'.

BRAND PERSONALITY

Attributes of a brand that influence its behaviour in the market place. These are often humanised and are used as part of the strategy and guidance for a brand. E.g. A warm caring friend.

BRAND POSITIONING

A sentence or phrase that defines the territory the brand wishes to occupy in the minds of its target audience. It defines its distinctive position compared with other brands. E.g. Holiday Inn "Championing the real world".

BRAND PROMISE

Communicates what target customers can expect from their experience with an organisation. It describes the value a company must deliver to its clients in order to motivate buying and loyalty behaviour. It drives the company's actions and investments in people, processes and products. E.g. Premier Inn: A good night's sleep, guaranteed.

BRAND PROPOSITION

A statement/strapline that summarises the brand benefits e.g. Symantec 'Creating confidence in a connected world'. Often used synonymously with Brand Positioning.

BRAND VALUE

How much more of a premium people are prepared to pay that can be attributed to the brand, normally calculated for the benefit of shareholders, taxation or financial assessment of intangible assets.

BRAND VALUES

Those attributes which define the brand and how it is different. The key is authenticity and delivering them consistently e.g. Virgin's values are: innovation, entertainment, customer champion and value.

BRANDED CUSTOMER EXPERIENCE

The impression that the customer receives at each and every touch-point and the extent to which this dramatises the brand promise and delivers a consistent, intentional, differentiated and valuable experience.

CUSTOMER EXPERIENCE DESIGN

A detailed map of the customer journey describing the processes and behaviours that will bring the customer promise alive at each key customer touch point. This should also identify the brand 'hallmarks' those specific moments where you can wow the customer to truly differentiate your brand and create a memorable experience.

CUSTOMER EXPERIENCE MANAGEMENT (CEM)

The entire process of defining, designing and delivering the experience that a customer receives which differentiates the brand and drives customer advocacy. What CRM consultants often say they offer but rarely do. (It's what we are best at even if we do say so ourselves!)

CUSTOMER EXPERIENCE SCORECARD

The key measures that enable the organisation to measure the delivery of its promise and impact on business results.

CUSTOMER JOURNEY

The keys steps where a customer engages with a brand; from awareness to purchase, to lifetime relationship.

CUSTOMER PROMISE

A collection of statements or customer commitments that support the overall brand promise at a more granular level and describe what the organisation will do to deliver the promise. Its purpose is to focus the entire organisation (and, as such, will not usually be communicated to customers) on those critical customer-focused actions that lead to improved business results. E.g. O2 'Making our customers lives easier'.

CUSTOMER RELATIONSHIP MANAGEMENT (CRM)

The process of capturing customer data, tracking customer behaviour and using this to communicate more effectively, for example loyalty cards. Often used too narrowly to mean the technology that enables it.

EPHEMERAL SOCIAL NETWORKS

Social media that self-destructs permitting ‘for your eyes only’ selfies.

HYPER-TARGETTING SOON TO BE OVERTAKEN BY NANO-TARGETTING

No shopper will ever be safe from being bombarded by personalised pop-up ads wherever they happen to be.

INTERNET OF THINGS

Everyday physical objects connected to the Internet. Enables your fridge to talk to your kettle to talk to your spouse to talk to you....(and so it goes on).

MOBILE EXPERIENCE

Allows consumers to do everything on the move and may well help solve the obesity crisis, if only people can develop skinny fingers.

OMNICHANNEL

Horrible buzzword for delivering your experience seamlessly across multiple channels.

PREDICTIVE ANALYSIS

Brands know what customers are going to do before they know it themselves...... scary!

PURPOSE/MISSION STATEMENT

A brief description of a company's fundamental purpose for being in business e.g. Nokia -' Connecting People'. Often confused with vision but visions are written in the future tense whereas a purpose/mission is present tense.

QUALITATIVE RESEARCH

Research designed to get broad reactions or to test scenarios. Tending to be more personal and to go deeper into a subject. Typically uses interviews or focus groups.

QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH

Research designed to get specific answers across the greatest number of respondents so that the results can be compared mathematically. Polls or surveys are a good example.

REAL-TIME DATA

Logs our preferences as we consume.

SHARE OF MIND

The number of target customers who have unprompted awareness of your brand. A marketing phrase used to describe the awareness and recognition of a brand. Usually measured by consumer recall.

SHARE OF WALLET

A marketing phrase meaning how much of the discretionary spend a particular brand enjoys of its customers.

SM

Either Sado-Masochism in a sexual context or more usually Social Media in the marketing context. (Although thinking about some of the marketers we know the two are often related!) SM refers to the new channels like Twitter and Facebook that are now an essential part of the marketing mix.

STRAWMAN

A draft idea that is work in progress. Often used to gauge reactions from executives or customers.

TECHNOLOGICAL EVALUATION OF BRAND BEHAVIOURS

Technology suppliers trying to make their kit more aligned with how customers actually want to use it.... there’s a radical thought.

TOP OF MIND

The brand that people think of first when asked to recall. It is the highest level of share of mind.

TOUCHLINE AND TOUCHLINE MAPPING

The depiction of the end-to-end journey a customer has of your brand and the significant points of interaction along it. E.g. Purchase.

UNIQUE SELLING PROPOSITION

An advertising concept from the 1970s that describes a specific product benefit. With the growth in competitive products USP's are becoming as rare as hen's teeth.

VALUE DRIVERS

To create a brand promise, you must first determine customers' value drivers i.e. those expectations that drive attraction, retention and referral of your most profitable customers e.g. seat comfort for long-haul passengers.

VERBAL IDENTITY/TONE OF VOICE

How the brand speaks to its audience. Normally described in a humanised way. For example, tones: warm and friendly, authoritative, straightforward and challenging e.g. Innocent smoothies: 'Enjoy by date'.

VISION STATEMENT

Outlines what a company wants to achieve. It focuses on the future; it is inspirational and engages people in a way that is highly focused and energising e.g. Apple ' A computer in every home'.

WEARABLE TECHNOLOGY

A chip embedded in your clothing (or your body!) that allows you to walk out of a shop with an item and have the payment automatically debited from your account.... ouch!